Myth-Busting: Does Cutting Eyelashes Make Them Grow?

no scissors

A recent YouTube video in which the vlogger proclaimed her extremely lengthy lashes are the result of regular trims hit a fever pitch when commenters debated the merits of this claim. Half of the commenters believed the practice of nipping the lashes works like snipping split ends from hair; the other half cried foul. Which is it?

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The verdict: Trimming lashes does nothing more than unnecessarily put a sharp object near the eye. That’s because eyelashes have a natural growth cycle (just like hair, which, sorry, doesn’t grow because of trims) that occurs in three parts:

  1. Anagen Phase: During this 30-to-45-day active growth period, hair synthesis occurs. Blood feeds the dermal papilla (responsible for growth) in the bulb of the hair follicle and cells in the hair matrix divide and add rapidly to the hair shaft.
  2. Catagen Phase: Known as the transitional phase, this two-to-three-week period finds the bulb shrinking and detaching from the dermal papilla, cutting off the blood supply and growth.
  3. Telogen Phase: This is the resting phase—and it’s exactly as it sounds. The hair sits in the follicle, no longer receiving new cell growth, until it eventually sheds.

RELATED: Lash Artists Need Top-Quality Training to Stay Ahead of the Curve

If your client asks about this myth, kindly let her know that it’s simply that: a myth!

Sources: The Essential Guide to Lash Extensions Technology by Sophy Merszei and Sophia Navarro; Cohen, JL. Enhancing the growth of natural eyelashes. Dermatologic Surgery, official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. 2010.